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Posts Tagged ‘living room’

We’ve gotten so caught up in our stories lately that we’ve forgotten to give you the cold, hard, photographic proof of the progress on the renovation. I was just going through our iPhoto library and discovered dozens of photos we haven’t been keeping you up to date on. Three major phases are complete, and the next three posts will show them all: framing, insulation, and drywall.

First, the framing. According to the date stamp on these photos, this phase was complete as of September 30.

Kitchen with pantry and half bath

Kitchen with pantry and half bath

The framed out kitchen, with the pantry in the foreground and the half-bath behind it.

Stairs and wall

Stairs and wall

The living room, with new stairs and new framing for wall.

Living/dining/kitchen

Living/dining/kitchen

View from bottom of stairs into office and kitchen.

Bathroom

Bathroom

Future site of our full upstairs bathroom.

Our bedroom

Our bedroom

This is the master bedroom. The framing for the wall only goes up to the height of where the ceiling used to be to give the finished room a loft-like, open and airy feel.

Walk-in closet

Walk-in closet

Our bedroom closet will go here, a nice walk-in sized closet where the house’s only, tiny bathroom used to be.

Sleep loft

Sleep loft

Framing for the sleep loft that will be above the bathroom, where the attic used to be.

Found!

Found!

Some old sheet music we found in the basement. When we move the piano in,  I’ll learn how to play it!

Floor grate in hall

Floor grate in hall

Our pretty, original floor grate in the upstairs hall.

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Some of these photos are more than a few days old, and as of today all of the exposed stud bays, sheathing, etc are covered in brand new spray foam insulation! Exciting progress….

I forgot to mention, in my last post about my defeat in the bathroom flooring realm, that I also had a chance to test out some techniques on our ceiling beams. Nick got us an orbit sander, and I used it to reveal some really nice-looking wood under layers upon layers of dirt. This photo shows the partially sanded wood (using medium grit sandpaper) to the right, and the untouched beam on the left.

Partially sanded ceiling beam

Partially sanded ceiling beam

After a few rounds with the sander, I realized that most of what it was taking off was dirt, not wood. So I spent the rest of my day using a big stiff-bristled brush to clean off the beams so that the sanding would be more efficient. I did my testing in the old dining room/soon-to-be-office room, because those beam will soon be covered over with drywall to hide the plumbing from the bathroom above. Here’s a shot of the living room ceiling:

Living room ceiling beams

Living room ceiling beams

I also bought a pack of Snow White Milk Paint at Artist and Craftsman, a really cool art supply store off Forest Ave. Milk Paint is made from a mix of casein, clay, lime and other pigments, and is totally natural with no VOCs. It mixed up pretty well in the old yogurt container I brought along, but it went on really, really stark white. We’re toying with the idea now of just leaving the beams sanded and unfinished, or treated only with the OSMO Polyx Oil or something similar. Here’s a bit of the milk paint on the ceiling:

Milk paint sample on ceiling

Milk paint sample on ceiling

It just doesn’t look right to me, sort of too elementary-school looking, or something. Of course, I could have used the Oyster White instead, a grayish but still clear white, but I’m beginning to think that the paint might not be the look we really want on the ceiling after all. If anything, I think we’d want the whitewashed ceiling look I referenced in an earlier post, but I’m beginning to realize that it’s much harder to get the look you want than you think it’s going to be.

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Lofty Ambitions

When we pulled down the old ceiling tile in the living room, we were thrilled to discover old wooden beams criss-crossing our ceiling. Not only did they look good, but they added at least another 5 or 6 inches to the ceiling height.

We plan to leave the beams exposed and paint them white, so our living room ends up looking something like this:

The ceiling of our dreams

The ceiling of our dreams

Yeah, I know, if our living room ends up looking even remotely like that one, we’d be lucky. But a girl can dream, right?

Our only hesitation is that our contractor thought that without insulating the ceiling we’d lose a lot of heat. We figure we need the heat in the bedroom above it anyway, so so what if the heat drifts upwards through the spaces between the floorboards. Your thoughts? Is it inefficient heating-wise to leave the ceiling unfinished?

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